Our Aboriginal Early Childhood Education (AECE) students embark on a fascinating journey:  They explore the dynamic field of child development, learn about the role of the professional early childhood educator, create early education curricula, practices, and stimulating learning environments that are sensitive to the developmental needs and interests of the young children. Working in the field of Early Childhood Education is an exciting and rewarding endeavour for a dedicated person whose aim is to make a difference by caring for young children.

The NEC Native Education College AECE Program trains Early Childhood Educators and care providers with a specialized Aboriginal cultural perspective. Early childhood is crucial for the formation of life-long learning skills and therefore the future success of a human being. Early Childhood Educators contribute significantly to the progress of the local community through their work with children. The childcare centre practicum placements allow each student to practice professional skills developed through the classroom component of the program. Students who have successfully completed the program can begin working under the supervision of a certified Early Childhood Education provider. Upon completion of 500 hours of paid or volunteer work, they can apply to the ECE Registry for certification. The certificate courses are also transferable to the post-basic ECE programs in Infant and Toddler Care and Special Needs Education offered at many local colleges.

Full-time Program starting in September:

  • Aboriginal Early Childhood Certificate
  • Combined Aboriginal Infant & Toddler Educator Diploma/Aboriginal Special Needs Educator Diploma

Aboriginal Special Needs Educator Diploma

NEC Native Education College has been successfully contributing to the urban First Nations community by offering basic Aboriginal Early Childhood Education program since 1988. Responding to the urgent need in qualified Special Needs Educators, we are offering this post-basic Diploma program.

Aboriginal Special Needs Educator Diploma is a stimulating and empowering program that includes balance of classroom academic studies and hands on practical experience in certified inclusive childcare settings. Our students have an exclusive opportunity to put into practice the knowledge learned in the classroom and experience this process in a real childcare setting. The program is rooted in the ages old Aboriginal perspectives and wisdom of child rearing and traditional ways of contributing to and relying on the community. Aboriginal Adult Teaching Methodology is practiced to train future AECE professionals.

Our post-basic AECE students further increase their knowledge in child development related to children with exceptionalities, learn about the role of the Special Needs Educator, create curricula for inclusive early childhood education settings, develop practices and stimulating learning environments that are sensitive to the developmental needs and interests of exceptional children, as well as to their culture.

The combination of the theoretical foundations of childrearing and solid practical experience of working with exceptional children enables our graduates to competently and confidently join the field of the Early Childhood Education as qualified and experienced Special Needs Educators in the province of British Columbia.

We prepare our graduates for successful career in the field of the Aboriginal Early Childhood Education as Special Needs Educators. Working in this field is an exciting and rewarding endeavour for a dedicated person whose aim is to make a difference in the community by caring for children with exceptionalities.

The program is offered on a full-time basis and runs for six month. Small class size and the Traditional Long House environment contribute to higher quality preparation of our graduates.

Native-Education-College-AECE-PDF

Human Growth & Development I
Credits: 4
This course is an in depth study of child development and learning from the prenatal period through the first two years of life. Historical perspectives and theories of child development as well as current research findings are discussed. Practical applications of child study are thoroughly examined and students will form their own theoretical perspective on child development and learning. Aboriginal child development is a significant part of this course. The role of the caregiver, ethics and different research strategies for child study are examined.

Foundations of Early Childhood Education
Credits: 3
This course outlines the field of ECE as a profession, the definition of the young child, the diversity of programs, the teacher’s role in the education process, and trends in ECE. This knowledge will empower students to apply fundamental ECE theories to their practice and to form their own perspective and philosophy of early childhood education and development. Students will examine ECE ethics, methods to promote the healthy development of young children, school readiness and the current licensing practices and regulations for ECE in British Columbia.

Creative Arts for Young Children
Credits: 3
The powerful self-expression of Aboriginal Art is a significant source of inspiration for this course. The great value of expressive art for the development of the creative process and the creative young child is explored. Students learn how to create emergent indoor and outdoor art activities, how to evaluate different art media, art elements, and learning environments for children. The students will be exposed to multicultural art experiences, will learn how to use Aboriginal arts and crafts with children, and will have opportunities to develop, design and implement their own artistic creations with a balance of open-ended and structured activities.

Observing & Recording Young Children
Credits: 3
Observing young children and recording their behaviour and development is considered essential practice in every quality childcare setting. The course examines the ethics of child study and methods for comparing behaviour to established developmental norms. The course will focus on professional writing skills geared specifically to recording children’s behaviour, integrating data from portfolios into forms and reports, interpreting and analyzing child developmental levels, producing summaries, interpretations, making recommendations and developing program strategies.

ECE Observation Practicum
Credits: 1
During this placement in a daycare setting, students will develop some knowledge of the childcare field through direct observations. They will familiarize themselves with an ECE centre and some ECE practices. Students will also practice and refine their skills in observing the behaviour and development of preschool children. In this first practicum, the student will learn first-hand about scheduling, daily routines and will observe activities and conversations.

Creative Movement & Music
Credits: 3
Aboriginal musical and dance traditions are an excellent way for young children to develop perception and thinking skills as well as creative self-expression. This course empowers students to incorporate music and movement, as natural elements, into the early childhood curriculum, into physical activities, active role-play and dramatic play by developing and implementing music and movement activities. The students will learn how to encourage children’s appreciation for the aesthetic value of making many kinds of music, including songs.

Guiding and Caring for Young Children
Credits: 3
Throughout this course students will learn and practice the developmentally appropriate principles and techniques of the guidance approach to the discipline of young children. Students will learn ways of dealing with mistaken behaviour and promoting self-discipline in young children. The use of positive guidance language is practiced. The students will learn to create the environment that reduces mistaken behaviour. The course empowers students to guide young children, acquaint parents with the concept of mistaken behaviour, and the influence of the environment on child behaviour.

Health, Safety and Nutrition
Credits: 3
This course focuses on the aspects of health, safety and nutrition related to early childhood centres. Issues include abuse and neglect, hygiene, emergency procedures and the recognition and management of childhood illness and allergies. Aboriginal traditional health practices are discussed. Dental care and its contribution to overall health are stressed. The importance and the ways of creating and maintaining safe environment in a childcare setting are discussed. Nutrition and its contribution to health are taken into account in meal planning. Students are given an overview of ECE administration, polices and procedures as they relate to health and safety issues.

This course provides students with he ability to design and implement a service management program to achieve consistent, quality service at all levels of an organization. Specific attention is given to the service team-culture, service sales skills, and the importance and role of First Nations hospitality. FirstHost certification, NEC’s one-day workshop on customer service skills, is part of the course.

Individual project
Credits: 2
The students will be assigned an early childhood education setting – a preschool or a daycare – where they will have a chance to observe a child and work on the developmental profile of that child in order to accomplish their assignments # 2 and # 3 for the ECE 112 Human Growth & Development course.

Practicum Preparation Seminar I
Credits: 1
Students’ and teachers’ expectations for the practicum will be discussed together with the goals and tasks for Block Practicum II and the practicum evaluation procedures. The ECE Profession Code of Ethics and confidentiality issues will be reviewed. The students will prepare their own teaching props, visual aids and materials to use during their practicum. The students will practice and prepare for a job interview. The students will discuss and develop their own time management techniques.

ECE Block Practicum I
Credits: 4
The students will be assigned an early childhood education setting – a preschool or a daycare – where they will have a chance to put their theoretical knowledge into practice. Students will observe teacher and child interactions and participate in creating stimulating learning environments for the children. During the second practicum, students will start planning, implementing and evaluating small group and individual activities. They will work on developing confidence for implementing full group activities such as learning circles.

Program Planning
Credits: 3
The focus of this course is the Play-Based Developmental-Interaction approach to ECE curriculum. This course will enable students to understand and practice the process of ECE curriculum development, implementation and evaluation. The course discusses developmental goals, developmental outcomes and performance objectives as the basis for ECE curriculum planning. Developmentally-appropriate ECE practices are applied to activity planning and stimulating play and learning environments and learning centres are developed. Multiculturalism and traditional Aboriginal culture are seen as an empowering force in creating a curriculum for the whole child.

Interpersonal Communication
Credits: 3
This course builds an understanding of the communication process, including Aboriginal communication practices, for positive interpersonal communication between children, teachers and parents. Students practice and build an arsenal of communication techniques and choose effective skills or techniques for given situations. The course discusses the influences of gender and culture on interpersonal communication and how to create a positive communication climate based on respect and inclusion.

Socials, Science, Math and Technology
Credits: 3
Students will explore the elements of math, socials, science, and technology in an ECE curriculum in order to acquire the knowledge and skills for planning these curriculum activities. It is essential for early childhood educators to plan activities and environments that promote this learning. In practice these activities are integrated throughout a well developed ECE curriculum. During this course students will develop implement and evaluate learning activities of math, science and social studies skills, including First Nations Studies.

Language & Literature
Credits: 3
During this course the students will review the ways children acquire language and become familiar with the importance of sensory perception in the acquisition of language. Aboriginal oral tradition is a significant component of this course.
Students evaluate children’s literature, develop materials and resources for teaching language and literacy and discuss the importance of the early pre-verbal years for success in language acquisition. Students will learn how to develop activities that promote language learning, develop skills in story book reading, storytelling, and presenting puppet shows.

Practicum Preparation Seminar II
Credits: 1
The instructor will organize the ECE activity brainstorming and sharing among the students. The students will prepare their own teaching props, visual aids and materials to use during their practicum. The students will produce a current and effective resume and write an informative cover letter to facilitate their employment search. They will also practice and prepare for a job interviews. The students will discuss and develop their own time management techniques.

Block Practicum II
Credits: 4
During this practicum the students are expected to work as staff team members to help create a stimulating learning environment for young children. They will develop and coordinate the implementation of developmentally appropriate ECE curriculum in the practicum centre, based on the children’s learning needs and interests. The students will start planning, implementing and evaluating small group and individual activities in all the areas of ECE curriculum. They will also start implementing full group activities and will develop two weekly activity planners.

Family and Community Relations
Credits: 3
This course focuses on the parent and teacher partnership in early childhood education settings and the importance of parent education and parent involvement in the centre. The students will learn how to make reports to parents. They will understand the diversity of families and the needs of families with atypical or mainstream children. Students will develop their knowledge of the community, how to access community services as well as how to positively contribute to their community. The main goal of this course is to enable students to help parents to be the best parents they can be.

ECE Advocacy
Credits: 3
This course develops the student’s understanding of Early Childhood Education as a profession and the duty of an ECE teacher to advocate for the well-being, adequate care and quality education of young children. The course encourages family support, feedback, education and networking with others. The current work by local, provincial and federal childcare advocacy groups to improve quality childcare will be supported. The students will realize the urgent need to make ECE stronger, better understood and more respected by government and the community.

Total Credits – 57.0

Semester I 

  • ECE 101    Human Growth & Development I
  • ECE 102    Foundations of  Early Childhood Education
  • ECE 103    Creative Arts for Young Children
  • ECE 104    Observing & Recording Young Children
  • ECE 113    Health, Safety and Nutrition
  • ECE 106    ECE Observation Practicum

Semester II 

  • ECE 114     Individual Project
  • ECE 111     Guiding and Caring For Young Children
  • ECE 112     Human Growth & Development II
  • ECE 115     Practicum Preparation Seminar I
  • ECE 116     ECE Block Practicum I
  • ECE 120     Early Learning Framework
  • ECE 121     Interpersonal Communications

Semester III

  • ECE 110    Creative Movement & Music
  • ECE 122    Socials, Science & Math and Technology
  • ECE 123    Language & Literature
  • ECE 125    Practicum Preparation Seminar II
  • ECE 126    ECE Block Practicum II 
  • ECE 127    Family and Community Relations
  • ECE 128    ECE Advocacy
  • Grade 12 Diploma or equivalent
  • 2 Letters of Reference
  • Criminal Records Check (from Victoria for Child Care)
  • TB Test results

     OR

  • Over 19 years of age or older at the date of application
  • Complete a Learning Assessment Test (please contact Admissions for further details about this requirement)
  • 2 Letters of Reference
  • Criminal Records Check (from Victoria for Child Care)
  • TB Test results

$5,350* (Tuition only)

*Full or partial funding may be available for this program. Contact NEC Admissions at 604-873-3761 x328 / admissions@necvancouver.org for more information.

Upon successful completion of this program, the graduates

  • Will be employment ready and qualified to work as an Early Childhood Education provider in a childcare setting
  • Can apply to the ECE registry for licensing after 500 hours of paid or volunteer work
  • Are adequately prepared and qualified for the ECE Diploma Programs, such as Infant and Toddler and Special Needs programs

Start Dates

AECE Certificate Intake:

  • September (Fall)
  • November (Winter)

Faculty Qualifications

Inga Kossoroukova, AECE Program Coordinator/Instructor — BA, M.Ed. in ECE, Current License to Practice ECE, SN, IAT in BC, Professional Instructor’s Diploma

Employment Prep

Students in all the programs are being trained for employment. The job search training is accomplished during the Practicum Preparation Seminars

Employers

Early Childhood Education settings in BC:  Day Care centres, Preschool centres

Partners

Aboriginal Head Start centres, Aboriginal Childcare centres
ECE cenres of the Lower Mainland

Note:  AECE Program  has no formal transfer agreements yet, but our Diploma graduates have been accepted into the third year of the Capilano University ECCE Degree program and our Certificate grads have been accepted to the Douglas College ECE Diploma Program. 

Working with Families of Infants and Toddlers and Exceptional Children
core course, 3 credits

This course focuses on the role of an Aboriginal Early Childhood Infant/Toddler and Special Needs Educator in working with families of infants and toddlers and with families of children who need extra support. In this course the students will critically examine parent and teacher partnership in inclusive early childhood education settings and the importance of parent education and parent involvement in the centre. Process of implementing a collaborative approach to responding to individual family needs will be studied. They will understand the diversity of families and the needs of families with infants and toddlers and atypical children. Students will develop their knowledge of the community, how to access community services for these categories of families. The main goal of this course is to enable students to help parents who need extra support to be the best parents they can be.

Supervision and Management
core Course, 3 credits

In ECE 269 Supervision and Management in Aboriginal Infant /Toddler Programs and Supported Childcare course students build upon knowledge in traditional aboriginal childcare practices, BC childcare regulations and program administration of inclusive environments for young children as well as infant/toddler environments. Specifics in the areas of policy and procedure, management skills, leadership, networking and advocacy guided by aboriginal perspectives will be included. This is a core course for both Infant/Toddler and Supported Childcare post-basic programs.
Course goal is to learn about aboriginal approaches to leadership, management and administration skills in planning, implementing and sustaining high quality aboriginal childcare services for children, families and
the community.

Aboriginal Health Care and Safety for Post-basic ECE courses
core course, 3 credits

The focus of ECE 280 Aboriginal Health Care in Infant Toddler Programs is on personal wellness and the planning, establishment and maintenance of a safe and healthy environment in programs for aboriginal infants and toddlers and exceptional children. Topics include: breastfeeding, babies first foods using traditional aboriginal approaches, safe food handling, planning nutritious traditional snacks and meals for infants and toddlers, diapering and toileting, injury prevention and hazard identification, illness management with infants and toddlers, modeling healthy practices and utilizing aboriginal community health resources, as well as specific disabilities and health related issues
Course goal is to provide opportunities to learn about caring for groups of infants and toddlers and exceptional children through the promotion of each child’s health, safety and wellbeing, including traditional aboriginal approaches and perspectives.

Aboriginal Early Childhood Education for Supported Childcare
ASN Practicum, 10 credits

This practicum experience is designed to provide the student, under supervision, with opportunities to apply and consolidate knowledge and skills in working with aboriginal children who require extra support in group settings. Over six weeks in length, this block practicum places each student in early childhood setting with the children who have additional support needs.

Advanced Child Growth & Development
core course, 3 credits

This core post-basic ECE course reviews both normal an atypical child development from prenatal to six years of age in key developmental domains including physical, social, emotional, spiritual, cognitive and language. It also reviews current developmental and learning theories of child development and discusses the contemporary research findings in the field. Aboriginal perspectives on raising infants and toddlers and raising children who require additional support are an empowering part of this course. Practical applications of child study are thoroughly examined and undertaken. Students will continue forming their own theoretical perspective on child development and learning.

Practices in Supported Childcare
ASN specialty course, 4 credits

In this course learners will study characteristics of exceptionalities in young children and their behavioral implication within inclusive environments. Understanding of the developmental and learning implications of developmental delays and of specific disabilities and health related issues will be the basis for learning specialized techniques and strategies that facilitate development and learning. Communication abilities of the child and ways of enhancing communication will be studied. The students will learn to plan, implement and evaluate an inclusive and developmentally appropriate Aboriginal program that meets the observed needs of children who require additional support.
COURSE GOAL: to develop and apply intervention and instructional strategies that will promote learning, self-esteem, social interaction and communication with young Aboriginal children who require extra support.

Augmentative Communication
ASN specialty course, 3 credits

This course supports Aboriginal children with extra needs by focusing on alternative forms of communications for children with little or no speech. Non-speech communication programming is examined through review of typical and disordered language and the strength and weaknesses of various augmentative communication systems. Communication systems studied include sign language and other manual systems, pictogram/ideogram communication and electronic systems. The students will develop positive approaches for guiding, caring and interacting/communicating with children with challenging behaviour/extra language needs who require additional support. Traditional ways of raising children with extra language needs will be looked at and practiced.

Responsive Inclusive Environments
ASN specialty course, 4 credits

In this course learners will have an opportunity to learn about ways of understanding and working with young children who have extra support needs within a variety of early childhood settings, including Aboriginal ECE settings. An inclusive approach with a foundation in knowledge of child development theory will be presented with an emphasis on individual planning and facilitating inclusionary practice. The students will plan accessible, enabling, inclusive indoor and outdoor play environments that meet the developmental needs of children who require additional support and ensure health, safety and wellbeing of the young children.
COURSE GOAL:
To learn about the characteristics, etiologies, and developmental and learning implications of common areas of disability in children and to develop and implement strategies which support families and facilitate optimal development within responsive inclusive environments and settings.

Semester 1

Core Courses of the Combined Diplomas Program:

  • ECE 269  Supervision and Management
  • ECE 282  Advanced Child Growth and Development
  • ECE 227  Working with Families
  • ECE 280  Aboriginal Health Care

Specialty Courses  of the Aboriginal Special Needs Educator Diploma Program:

  • ECE 289  Responsive Inclusive Environments
  • ECE 287  Practices in Supportive Childcare
  • ECE 288 Augmentative Communication
  • ECE 281 Block Practicum in Supported Childcare Setting (220 hours)

Note:  Students can sign up for the Aboriginal Special Needs Educator Diploma Program separately, or in combination with the Aboriginal Infant and Toddler Educator  Diploma.

Basic Early Childhood Education Certificate

$2,775* (Tuition only)

*Full or partial funding may be available for this program. Contact NEC Admissions at 604-873-3761 x328 / admissions@necvancouver.org for more information.

Start Dates

AECE Post Basic Intake (Infant and Toddler, Special Needs, or Dual):

  • September (Fall)

Faculty Qualifications

Inga Kossoroukova, AECE Program Coordinator/Instructor — BA, M.Ed. in ECE, Current License to Practice ECE, SN, IAT in BC, Professional Instructor’s Diploma

Employment Prep

Students in all the programs are being trained for employment. The job search training is accomplished during the Practicum Preparation Seminars

Employers

Early Childhood Education settings in BC:  Day Care centres, Preschool centres

Partners

Aboriginal Head Start centres, Aboriginal Childcare centres
ECE cenres of the Lower Mainland

Note:  AECE Program  has no formal transfer agreements yet, but our Diploma graduates have been accepted into the third year of the Capilano University ECCE Degree program and our Certificate grads have been accepted to the Douglas College ECE Diploma Program. 

Working with Families of Infants and Toddlers and Exceptional Children
core course, 3 credits

This course focuses on the role of an Aboriginal Early Childhood Infant/Toddler and Special Needs Educator in working with families of infants and toddlers and with families of children who need extra support. In this course the students will critically examine parent and teacher partnership in inclusive early childhood education settings and the importance of parent education and parent involvement in the centre. Process of implementing a collaborative approach to responding to individual family needs will be studied. They will understand the diversity of families and the needs of families with infants and toddlers and atypical children. Students will develop their knowledge of the community, how to access community services for these categories of families. The main goal of this course is to enable students to help parents who need extra support to be the best parents they can be.

Supervision and Management
core Course, 3 credits

In ECE 269 Supervision and Management in Aboriginal Infant /Toddler Programs and Supported Childcare course students build upon knowledge in traditional aboriginal childcare practices, BC childcare regulations and program administration of inclusive environments for young children as well as infant/toddler environments. Specifics in the areas of policy and procedure, management skills, leadership, networking and advocacy guided by aboriginal perspectives will be included. This is a core course for both Infant/Toddler and Supported Childcare post-basic programs.
Course goal is to learn about aboriginal approaches to leadership, management and administration skills in planning, implementing and sustaining high quality aboriginal childcare services for children, families and
the community.

Aboriginal Health Care and Safety for Post-basic ECE courses
core course, 3 credits

The focus of ECE 280 Aboriginal Health Care in Infant Toddler Programs is on personal wellness and the planning, establishment and maintenance of a safe and healthy environment in programs for aboriginal infants and toddlers and exceptional children. Topics include: breastfeeding, babies first foods using traditional aboriginal approaches, safe food handling, planning nutritious traditional snacks and meals for infants and toddlers, diapering and toileting, injury prevention and hazard identification, illness management with infants and toddlers, modeling healthy practices and utilizing aboriginal community health resources, as well as specific disabilities and health related issues
Course goal is to provide opportunities to learn about caring for groups of infants and toddlers and exceptional children through the promotion of each child’s health, safety and wellbeing, including traditional aboriginal approaches and perspectives.

Advanced Child Growth & Development
core course, 3 credits

This core post-basic ECE course reviews both normal an atypical child development from prenatal to six years of age in key developmental domains including physical, social, emotional, spiritual, cognitive and language. It also reviews current developmental and learning theories of child development and discusses the contemporary research findings in the field. Aboriginal perspectives on raising infants and toddlers and raising children who require additional support are an empowering part of this course. Practical applications of child study are thoroughly examined and undertaken. Students will continue forming their own theoretical perspective on child development and learning.

Aboriginal Practices with Infants and Toddlers
specialty course, 8 credits

This culmination course is designed to prepare the student to work as an Early childhood Educator with children under three years in an Aboriginal community. Emphasis will be on professional decision making, designing and implementing a safe nurturing inclusive Aboriginal program. This course builds on and expands knowledge from the basic ECE program regarding early childhood development theory, Aboriginal philosophy, historical approaches and high quality care.
Course goal: the students will be prepared to participate fully in final Infant Toddler practicum responsibilities. Students will explore development from theoretical and aboriginal perspectives to enhance infant toddler development within the context of Aboriginal families, centres and communities.

Aboriginal Early Childhood Education for Infants and Toddlers
Block Practicum, 10 credits

This practicum experience is designed to provide the student, under supervision, with opportunities to apply and consolidate knowledge and skills in working with aboriginal infants and toddlers in group settings. Five weeks in length, this block practicum places each student in early childhood setting for children under age three.

Semester 1:

Core Courses of the Combined Diplomas Program:

  • ECE 269 Supervision and Management
  • ECE 282 Advanced Child Growth and Development
  • ECE 227 Working with Families
  • ECE 280 Aboriginal Health Care

Specialty Courses for the Aboriginal Infant and Toddler Educator Diploma:

  • ECE 294  Aboriginal Practices with Infants and Toddlers
  • ECE 295  Block Practicum in an Infant anf Toddler Setting (220 hours)

Note: Students can sign up for the Aboriginal Infant and Toddler Educator Diploma separately, or in combination with the Aboriginal Special Needs Educator Diploma Program.

Basic Early Childhood Education certificate

$2,775* (Tuition only)

*Full or partial funding may be available for this program. Contact NEC Admissions at 604-873-3761 x328 / admissions@necvancouver.org for more information.

Start Dates

AECE Post Basic Intake (Infant and Toddler, Special Needs, or Dual):

  • September (Fall)

Faculty Qualifications

Inga Kossoroukova, AECE Program Coordinator/Instructor — BA, M.Ed. in ECE, Current License to Practice ECE, SN, IAT in BC, Professional Instructor’s Diploma

Employment Prep

Students in all the programs are being trained for employment. The job search training is accomplished during the Practicum Preparation Seminars

Employers

Early Childhood Education settings in BC:  Day Care centres, Preschool centres

Upon successful completion of this program, the graduates:

  1. Will be employment ready and qualified to work under supervision of a certified Infant and Toddler Educator in an Infant and Toddler childcare setting
  2. Can apply to the ECE registry for Infant and Toddler Licensing

Partners

Aboriginal Head Start centres, Aboriginal Childcare centres
ECE cenres of the Lower Mainland

Note:  AECE Program  has no formal transfer agreements yet, but our Diploma graduates have been accepted into the third year of the Capilano University ECCE Degree program and our Certificate grads have been accepted to the Douglas College ECE Diploma Program. 

Need Help With Tuition?

Financial assistance is available to students in the form of scholarships and bursaries, loans and other funding options. Contact Admissions for more information.

Learn More About Financial Aid

Questions?

For more NEC Program information visit the Admissions section or call

1 (604) 873-3772 ext. 328